E-Safety

Internet Safety

I.T and online safety for our children is very important in this day and age. The way children use the internet changes constantly so we ensure that we cover the topic to educate the children on being responsible and safe internet users.

 The breadth of issues classified within online safety is considerable, but can be categorised into three areas of risk:

 

  • content: being exposed to illegal, inappropriate or harmful material; for example, adult material, fake news, racist or radical and extremist views;
  • contact: being subjected to harmful online interaction with other users; for example, commercial advertising as well as adults posing as children or young adults; and
  • conduct: personal online behaviour that increases the likelihood of, or causes, harm; for example, making, sending and receiving explicit images, or online bullying.

We aim to continuously develop an in-depth curriculum that covers the online safety issues above.

We are very proud of our Year 6 E.Safety Ambassadors who are constantly advising and encouraging all the children to use the Internet safely and giving advice if they are concerned or worried.  The help with all our E.Safety events and also create competition in order to ensure that this most important issue is constantly being addressed in school and at home.

We do ensure that we cover E.Safety day each February as well as maintaining a high profile during Anti-Bullying week and other times.

We use a range of excellent sites to help teach the subject, click the images below to link to the main ones. 

 

TIK TOK ALERT

You may be aware of a current video circulating on Tik Tok regarding a male committing suicide with a firearm. This is a significant concern that young people may access this material which is extremely disturbing and demonstrates the risk of apps and material accessible online to children and young people.  

 

As always following national guidance the networks advice is to provide support in general terms rather than referencing specific content with young people as this often has the effect of amplifying the event or content.

 

We have provided a PDF for those with caring/parental responsibilities information on the Tiktok app courtesy on National Online Safety, it is important that parents/guardians make themselves familiar with all social media apps and settings in which to help safeguard their young people from the risks which are present online. You can learn about a variety of apps and other online safety issues at www.nationalonlinesafety.com

 

National campaigns on a range of online safeguarding issues can be accessed via www.thinkuknow.co.uk /professionals

 

 

 

Internet Safety

I.T and online safety for our children is very important in this day and age so we ensure that we cover the topic on an ongoing basis.

 

We are very proud of our Year 6 E.Safety Ambassadors who are constantly advising and encouraging all the children to use the Internet safely and giving advice if they are concerned or worried.  The help with all our E.Safety events and also create competition in order to ensure that this most important issue is constantly being addressed in school and at home.

 

We do ensure that we cover E.Safety day each February as well as maintaining a high profile during Anti-Bullying week and other times.

 

We use a range of excellent sites to help teach the subject, click the images below to link to the main ones. 

 

 

PARENTS HELPSHEET: PRIMARY
Thinkuknow: keeping your child safe online while they are off school
Thinkuknow is the national online safety education programme from CEOP, the online child protection command of the National Crime Agency.
Thinkuknow helps parents, carers, teachers and others keep children safe from sexual abuse, offering learning activities, advice and support for children and young people aged 4-18 and their families.
While school is closed, here’s what you can do to keep your child stay safe while they are learning and having fun online.
8 steps to keep your child safe online this month
1. Explore together: Ask your child to show you their favourite websites and apps and what they do on them. Listen, show interest and encourage them to teach you the basics of the site or app.
2. Chat little and often about online safety: If you’re introducing them to new learning websites and apps while school is closed, take the opportunity to talk to them about how to stay safe on these services and in general. Ask if anything ever worries them while they’re online. Make sure they know that if they ever feel worried, they can get help by talking to you or another adult they trust.
3. Help your child identify trusted adults who can help them if they are worried: This includes you and other adults at home, as well as adults from wider family, school or other support services who they are able to contact at this time. Encourage them to draw a picture or write a list of their trusted adults.
4. Be non-judgemental: Explain that you would never blame them for anything that might happen online, and you will always give them calm, loving support.
5. Supervise their online activity: Keep the devices your child uses in communal areas of the house such as in the living room or kitchen where an adult is able to supervise. Children of this age should not access the internet unsupervised in private spaces, such as alone in a bedroom or bathroom.
6. Talk about how their online actions affect others: If your child is engaging with others online, remind them to consider how someone else might feel before they post or share something. If they are considering sharing a photo/video of somebody else, they should always ask permission first.
7. Use ‘SafeSearch’: Most web search engines will have a ‘SafeSearch’ function, which will allow you to limit the content your child can access whilst online. Look out for the ‘Settings’ button on your web browser homepage, which is often shaped like a small cog.
8. Parental controls: Use the parental controls available on your home broadband and all internet enabled devices in your home. You can find out more about how to use parental controls by visiting your broadband provider’s website.
Teaching e-safety at school is only part of the story, though. Parents and carers should also be aware of issues and reinforce and add to our children’s knowledge and understanding.  We are paying particular attention to helping parents/carers understand the importance of knowing what your child is doing on line and how to help if they encounter any difficulties.
 
The NSPCC have produced excellent guides to e-safety concerns for parents. Click on links to view printable guides.
 

Social Networking

We would like to remind parents that age restrictions for sites such as Facebook and Twitter are currently age 13.  Realistically however, we acknowledge that younger children do have access to these sites so would remind parents to ensure that adequate precautions are taken to keep your child safe.

Click on links for printable leaflets giving advice for staying safe using social media.